What You Need to Know About Reporting a Stolen Car

Can you imagine how it would feel to park your car somewhere, only to find it missing later on? Many people experience this tragedy on a daily basis. In fact, according to CNBC.com, “Roughly 800,000 to one million cars are stolen in America every single year.” These numbers are extraordinary, making car theft a common occurrence all across the country. This also means that the insurance claim process can be quite complex and tedious.

If you are prepared to report your car as stolen, there are a few important things you should know about car insurance coverage for stolen vehicles, as well as the investigation process for car theft claims. Continue reading to learn what you need to know about filing an insurance claim for a stolen car.

FIRST: Was Your Car Really Stolen?

Once you have noticed that your car is missing, it is wise to reconsider all the possibilities before making an insurance claim and police report. You can check for parking signs to see if it had been towed, ask friends and family if they borrowed your vehicle, or call your car loan company to see if it was repossessed. When there is no other possible reason for your car to be missing, then it is safe to move forward with filing an insurance claim and police report.

Insurance Coverage for Stolen Cars

In order to have insurance coverage in the case that your car is stolen, you must have comprehensive coverage on your insurance policy. This is something that is required in all states. If your vehicle is stolen off of your personal property, you cannot file it under your home owners’ insurance policy; you must have an auto policy with comprehensive coverage to cover the loss.

Car Theft Claims Process

When you are sure your car has been stolen, you must report it to the police immediately for documentation. At the same time, you must notify your auto insurance carrier. Most carriers operate using a 30-day claim waiting period to see if the car is ever recovered, which generally begins on the date of theft. Furthermore, comprehensive coverage does not cover personal belongings that are stolen out of a vehicle. Items like phones, computers, clothing, jewelry, equipment, and more, could be covered in a renter’s or home insurance policy, but not in an auto policy.

Car Theft Investigations

Car theft claims are taken very seriously at insurance companies. They are investigated closely by adjusters to ensure that fraud is not at play. Filing a fraudulent car theft insurance claim is a felony punishable by prison time, fines, and more. They will record all conversations with clients, and ask very detailed and intrusive questions. As long as you are not committing a crime, you shouldn’t take the investigation process personally. The insurance adjuster is just doing their job.

Hire a Criminal Defense Lawyer for Fraud Charges

Fraud crimes are charged as either misdemeanors or felonies, depending on the particulars of a person’s case. If you were recently arrested on facing fraud charges in Indiana, you are facing hefty fines, imprisonment, and other severe penalties. The best step you can take toward securing your rights and protecting your freedoms is calling a licensed fraud lawyer for tough and aggressive criminal defense; otherwise, you risk be sentenced to the maximum levels of punishment in Indiana.

Are You Guilty When It Comes to Road Rage?

As per a national auto club, just about eighty percent of American drivers admit to angry driving tendencies at one time or other. It is particularly shocking to discover this from the report: nearly eight million vehicle operators say they demonstrated certain forms of road rage. This included ramming into another car on purpose and getting out of a vehicle to confront another driver in a menacing manner.

How would you rate yourself in regard to the above?

Go through the list below characterizing aggressive driving and check off any point that defines your own driving habits.

Does any of the following describe your actions while driving a vehicle?

• Have you tailgated another car or truck on purpose?
• Have you driven significantly over the legal speed limit?
• Have you run through a red or amber light?
• Have your Snaked in and out of cars and traffic?
• Have you raised your voice and screamed at another driver?
• Have you slammed on the horn and honked to show your anger at another motorist?
• Have you demonstrated your frustration and rage through hand gestures?
• Have you tried to prevent another driver from changing traffic lanes?
• Have you deliberately cut off another driver?

We all get angry at one point or another. This is because we are all human and humans by design are not perfect. Nonetheless, anger that is unchecked can be a very dangerous emotion, leading to actions that are later regretted.

Of course, when anger is evident in driving, the danger is so much greater. It can lead to hostile actions that intimidate, bully or incite others on the road and result in physical losses and damages as well as injury and the tragic loss of life. For the aggressive driver that thinks auto insurance may bail him out of liability, in general this is far from the truth.

In fact, the insurance providers do not take any responsibility for motorists that deliberately use dangerous or illegal modes of driving.

As one insurance professional so aptly put it, “Don’t expect your auto insurance cover to come to your defense if you drive aggressively. Driving in rage will not only put your at risk, it places anyone else on the road in danger. If you drive in an irresponsible manner, you will be up against all the criminal and fiscal penalties on your own.”

The same auto club that conducted the afore-mentioned study concludes with some sage advice.

1. Don’t ever provoke another motorist to retaliate by compelling him to change speeds or directions.

2. Be tolerant of other drivers’ and don’t allow yourself to get angered by another driver’s actions.

3. If another driver displays anger on the road, do not respond by making eye contact or gestures. Try to stay at a safe distance and if you feel your safety may be compromised, contact police.

The Cost of Auto Insurance in Nova Scotia

Car Insurance Rates Across Canada
Although the rates in Nova Scotia are much less than the majority of the country, you still deserve to find the lowest rate plan available. The average car insurance rate in this province is around $91 per month, or $1,093 per year. This is compared to the average rates in Alberta, which are currently sitting at about $114 per month, or $1,371 per year. Worse still, paying the average auto insurance rates in Ontario will set you back about $160 per month, or $1,916 per year.

As with most of Canada, young drivers in Nova Scotia will often pay more than older adults. The province’s young adults – between 25 to 30 years of age – will pay an average of $103 per month, or $1,241 per year in auto insurance. Those between 46 and 50 years of age pay an average of $81 per month, or $976 per year, while older adults – between 61 and 65 years of age – pay very little, at an average of $73 per month, or $878 per year. Nova Scotia’s youngest drivers (under the age of 25) pay the most, with an average car insurance rate of $210 per month or $2,522 per year.

Age isn’t the only factor that affects your auto insurance rates – your gender does as well. On average, men pay about $94 per month in auto insurance, while women often pay approximately $88 a month.

Cheapest Car Insurance Rates in Canada
Nova Scotia ranks 5th for having the lowest premiums on auto insurance in Canada. Most people in the province don’t have to pay much more than the cheapest premiums available in the country. There is only a $59 difference between the cheapest car insurance available in Canada and the average cost for auto insurance in Nova Scotia. All five of the cheapest auto insurance options in the country come from less populated provinces. The difference among the most populated and least populated of the top five lowest options (excluding Quebec) is only 955,445 people. Due to their similar population sizes, the auto insurance premiums among these provinces is also quite close.

Nova Scotia Car Insurance Coverage Options
It is interesting to take a closer look at the coverage chosen most often by drivers in Nova Scotia:

· People who choose the most minimal auto insurance allowed by law pay approximately $69 per month in premiums. This kind of coverage doesn’t cover any damages to your own vehicle, but it does cover the costs accumulated by a third party if you’re involved in an accident. This kind of coverage would work for you if you have an older car that you wouldn’t consider repairing if it were to become damaged.

· If you’re leasing a vehicle, you need more than just the bare minimum coverage, and you should look into medium-level coverage that offers liability, collision, and comprehensive damage protection. This kind of coverage will set you back approximately $93 per month.

· Coverage above this level often includes more comprehensive policies that have accident benefit coverage at much higher than the average car insurance policies in Nova Scotia. Costs of these policies rise to $104 per month, as a result. Since there is a relatively small difference between medium and extensive coverage, it is worth your while to consider extensive auto insurance coverage. Saving just a few dollars isn’t worth the additional risk to you or your family.

Your driving record has a big impact on your insurance premiums. If you don’t have any violations within the past six years, you could easily receive reduced rates as cheap as $84 per month or $1,002 per year on car insurance. Having a maximum of even two violations in the last three years makes your car insurance premiums rise exponentially, to approximately $189 per month, or $2,273 a year for auto insurance.

What You Need for Coverage in Nova Scotia
In Nova Scotia, it is mandatory for drivers to have $500,000 in third party liability coverage, at least $50,000 in medical payment coverage, and $2,500 in funeral expense coverage. You will also need $250 a week for disability insurance. As a law in Nova Scotia, you cannot sue for more than $8,123 in pain and suffering caused by major injuries. This rule actually saves insurance companies money, allowing the province to have an average insurance premium as low as $783.